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Jewelry Trends Fall 2016 & The Statement Pocket Watch Necklace
10 / 17

 

FALL JEWELRY TRENDS 2016: BOLD STATEMENT PIECES

 

The fall runways were full of rich jewel toned colors which happen to be the perfect backdrop for statement jewelry for Fall. Ellie Saab featured standout, oversized chandelier earrings, but only on one ear.

 

 

Elie Saab Fall 2016 Couture Fashion Show Courtesy of Vogue

 

 

 

Elie Saab Fall 2016 Couture Fashion Show Courtesy of Vogue

 

STATEMENT NECKLACES & LOTS OF CHAINS


Versace sprinkled their show with layers of chains, large link long chains and chunky chokers.

 

 

Versace Fall 2016 Courtesy of Haper’s Bazaar

 

GOLD MEDALLIONS, POCKET WATCHES & MORE CHAINS

 

My favorite show for jewelry was John Galliano Fall 2016 Ready to Wear. His catwalk was full of gold medallions and pocket watches hanging from gold chains in an array of lengths, from Choker to Opera.

 

It perfectly illustrates our mantra: Making Antique Jewelry Wearable. Combining today’s fashion with antique jewelry (or what looks to be) to create a one-of-a-kind look.

 

 

John Galliano Fall 2016 Courtesy of Vogue

 

 

John Galliano Fall 2016 Courtesy of Vogue

 

 

John Galliano Fall 2016 Courtesy of Vogue

 

 

John Galliano Fall 2016 Courtesy of Vogue

 

HOW TO GET THE LOOK: JEWELRY EDITION

 

Here are some of our pieces, actual antique pocket watches and chains that you can combine with your fall cashmere and silk to create your own one-of-a-kind look.

 

ANTIQUE 15 KT GOLD POCKET WATCH & LONG GUARD CHAIN

 

This is a heart-shaped Antique Demi-Hunter pocket watch in 15 Kt rose gold.

 

 

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The versatility comes from the fact that there are two distinct sides to the Demi-Hunter or hunter pocket watch one. With the dial side out, you get the classic look of a pocket watch. With the cover side out, it looks more like a gold locket. We are showing it with an Antique Victorian rose gold guard chain. At 57 inches, you can double or triple it to get the layered chain look. The chain has a dog clip/swivel clip which makes it really easy to change what you wear on the end of it.

 

 

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ANTIQUE VICTORIAN “SHOOTING STARS” POCKET WATCH

 

if you love the chain and pocket watch Galliano shown on the model wearing the sheer skirt and white angora sweater, you will love our version. Below is our antique shooting stars demi-hunter pocket watch paired with our antique Victorian mid-length gold link chain.

 

 

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For more details or to make a purchase see our Pendant and Charms collection for the pocket watches and our Necklace and Chains collection, to browse our antique gold chains and other items.

 

10 / 04

 

THE FOX AND THE HOUND

 

Below are two examples of 19th century miniature portraiture jewelry. The names for these pieces are often used interchangeably, but they are in fact very different.

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The fox and the hound are recent additions to the boutique. The Jack Russell Terrier brooch on the right, is a Reverse Intaglio Crystal Brooch. It is often erroneously called an Essex Crystal. So much so, that dealers often refer to these pieces as Essex Crystals, even though they know that they are not. The moniker is used so often and is so widespread, that it has sort of stuck. On the left, is a painted enamel miniature portrait of a fox by W.B. Ford, a student of William Essex’.

 

WHAT IS A REVERSE INTAGLIO CRYSTAL?

 

The reverse intaglio crystal is an art form that is time consuming, painstaking, and involves multiple steps.

 

It begins with a piece of rock crystal. The rough is repeatedly polished by hand, with a progressively fine polishing tool to create a domed cabochon on one side and a flat back on the other. The design is drawn on the flat back/reverse side of the crystal cabochon, it is hand carved, and then painted by a master artisan. This yields a three-dimensional appearance. In this particular example, you can even see the shadow of the dog’s muzzle. Finally, it is sealed with a back, typically mother of pearl or gold.

 

The technique originated in Belgium with Emile Marius Pradier (circa 1860). Reverse Intaglio Crystals were developed and popularized by Thomas Cooke in England (circa 1880). There are many out there, but the good ones are few and far between. It is relatively easy to see the difference in the quality from piece to piece. Take out your loupe and you can see the fineness in the details.

 

WILLIAM ESSEX, W.B. FORD AND THE ENAMEL MINIATURE PORTRAIT

 

William Essex (c.1784 – 1869) was an English enamel painter. He is widely regarded as the best enamelist of his generation. He first exhibited at the Royal Academy in London in 1818. He was appointed enameler to Queen Victoria in 1839 and wrote a treatise on the art of enameling. Most of his work is based on copies of the Old Masters or works by famous contemporaries such as Landseer and Winterhalter.

 

William Bishop Ford (1832 – 1922), the artist who painted the miniature fox portrait at the center of the brooch above, was a student of William Essex’. Ford also specialized in the painting of miniature enamels and exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1854 – 1895. Like Essex, Ford painted miniatures based upon oil painting by famous masters. The fox head portrait above, by Ford, is after “The Fox” (1817) by Abraham Cooper. An engraving print on paper, reflecting the work by Abraham Cooper (1787 – 1868), is part of Victoria & Albert Museum’s collection. According to V&A, the print is “…FROM THE ORIGINAL PICTURE BY A. COOPER.”

 

 

 

Courtesy of the Victoria & Albert Museum, Abraham Cooper, The Fox

 

 

When I first started researching the topic, I wondered why painting a miniature portrait in enamel was considered its own art form. I was surprised to find out how difficult and challenging it was. According to the V&A museum, “The advantage of enamel over traditional miniature painting (watercolour painted on vellum or on ivory) is that it does not fade when exposed to light.” The cons are that it is a challenging process fraught with risk. “The first colours to be laid on the metal support have to be the ones that need to be fired at the highest temperature. Then more colours are added and the enamel is re-fired. The process ends with the colours that need the lowest temperature. Such labour meant that it was an expensive option.”

 

In an article from 1837 in The London and Edinburgh Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, “Some Account of the Art of Painting in Enamel,” Alfred Essex, William’s partner and brother, writes of the difficulty of achieving the desired colors and crispness of image required to rival the traditional medium of oil on canvas.

 

ESSEX CRYSTAL: MYTH OR FACT?

 

So why does the erroneous moniker “Essex Crystal” persist? Because it is so widespread, dealers still use it to help those that are looking for what they think are Essex Crystals find what they are looking for, and so it goes. How did the misnomer get started? There are several stories circulating as to the origin. William Essex was the enamel painter for Queen Victoria and created other amazing small portraits using enamels. It is possible that because the artwork is so fine and because both are forms of small portraits that Reverse Intaglio Crystals were attributed to William Essex.

 

HOW TO WEAR THEM


In love with the fox or the hound, but not a brooch wearer? A simple addition of one or two hinged bails would make it possible to wear the Reverse Intaglio Crystal as a pendant. I would pair it with an Albert Watch Chain (on the chunky side). Many enamel portraits are being converted to pendants or rings. The fox would also make a lovely pendant. It is relatively lighter and could be worn with a more delicate chain.